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Wordless Wednesday: Layers

Want to see more? Check my blog Sunshine and snow in Tirol

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Sunshine and snow in Tirol

The Swiss Alps were a summer holiday destination when I was young. Since then, I’ve visited the mountains in all seasons: spring, autumn and winter. Every season has its own charm, I think. This month, I finally had the opportunity to visit the Alps again, this time in Tirol, Austria. No skiing for us this time, but we had some lovely time hiking and snowshoeing. It was a beautiful week with fresh snow and sunshine – winter and spring.

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Lovely view of the village church from our balcony.

 

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One day rain in the valley, snow higher up the mountain. The next day: fresh snow and sunshine.

 

With sun and clouds, day and night, the view changes dramatically.

 

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Rolling clouds or waves?

On my last flight from Birmingham to Amsterdam (Schiphol), we had the setting sun right behind us.

Beneath the clouds, the sky changed colour from orange, via dark red to pink.

Looking at the top half this almost abstract photo, I imagine it could be a seaside picture of rolling waves. In the bottom half, you can just make out the Norfolk coastline.

Luckily, not all the seats were occupied so I could move from the left to the righthand side of the cabin. There I captured this amazing view:

 

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Orange-red colours below the cotton-bud-clouds, rainbow colours in the feathery clouds above.

 

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Orange clouds and red sun

It was the strangest of sights yesterday. From daybreak onwards, the clouds had an orange hue to them. As if a thunderstorm was continuously looming. Around midday, the sun was briefly visible and it was as red as you would expect it to be around sunset.

Apparently, the orange sky had to do with hurricane Ophelia raging over Ireland. In England, we had certainly no hurricane-like storm, but it was quite windy.

RedSky-3According to the BBC, dust particles in the air cause blue light to scatter, leaving longer-wavelength red light to shine through. The dust travelled a long way before it reached the West Midlands: it was brought in from the Sahara and the forest fires sweeping over Portugal and Northwest Spain.

RedSky-2Around 3 pm the clouds broke and the orange tint disappeared. But it returned in the clouds around sunset.

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Concrete cathedral

How rare a sight this is: A big, bold industrial building surrounded by nature. And these two not clashing, but creating something truly remarkable.Radio Kootwijk-1Radio Kootwijk is such a site I think. The radio station in art deco style -nicknamed The Cathedral- was built in the early 1920s and rises like a monolith from the open field. The grey concrete and purple heather shrubs create a strong contrast, especially by the end of August when the heather is in bloom.Radio Kootwijk-6

 

 

I took these pictures on a warm summer evening. The rays of sunlight were filtered by thin clouds. You could look right through the building. In the glass pane behind the wrought iron door, you can see the reflection of the nearby water tower.

On Open Monumentendag, the Dutch equivalent of England’s Heritage Open Days, the radio station is open to the public (free entrance). I find the inside of this building designed by architect Julius Luthmann (1890-1973) just as striking as the outside, especially the tiled floor in the main hall.

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From the tower, you have a wonderful view of the surrounding heath and woods.

 

 

The architect had a sphynx in mind when he designed the radio station. Especially from the back, the building gives the impression of a resting animal.